North Carolina Prevention Partners recognizes FirstHealth hospitals

Special to the Chronicle
North Carolina Prevention Partners has recognized FirstHealth of the Carolinas for providing the highest standard of excellence for tobacco-cessation programs offered to patients.
The three FirstHealth hospitals – Moore Regional in Pinehurst, Richmond Memorial in Rockingham and Montgomery Memorial in Troy – were acknowledged as Gold Heart Standard Hospitals. FirstHealth is the first health system in the state to receive the recognition.
NC Prevention Partners works with corporate leaders and staffs in North Carolina hospitals to enhance tobacco-cessation efforts and resources available to all hospital employees and patients. The FirstHealth hospitals were recognized for identifying tobacco-using patients as a required vital sign, providing a team approach to cessation counseling, providing and promoting evidence-based treatments, and evaluating the quit-tobacco system. These are among several components recommended by NC Prevention Partners for comprehensive quit-tobacco systems for patients.
FirstHealth’s inpatient tobacco-cessation program is provided by Community Health Services. Health Programs Manager Linda Harte supervises the team of specially trained health educators who work with the program. She says the inpatient program, which began as a pilot at Moore Regional during the summer of 2009, was a logical expansion of the established outpatient FirstQuit program that was started more than 10 years ago.
FirstQuit receives daily referrals from FirstHealth Home Care Services for patients who are discharged from the tobacco-free environment of a hospital only to find themselves challenged to continue their tobacco-free status at home.
A couple of years ago, that situation prompted a discussion about tobacco-cessation services that could be offered to inpatients and, Harte says, “how we could identify tobacco-using patients sooner” and “support them better while in the hospital.”
Eventually, the discussion turned toward giving hospitalized patients the motivation and confidence to remain tobacco free once they got home and providing options that would help them achieve their tobacco-free goal.
A committee comprised of staff representatives from various FirstHealth departments worked for about six months to develop the inpatient plan. The process they came up with begins as the patient is being admitted to the hospital and is identified by nursing staff as being a tobacco-user. It continues when the physician in charge of the patient’s hospitalization orders a consultation with a Community Health Services tobacco treatment specialist (TTS).
During the bedside consultation, the patient is told that his/her doctor requested the session and asked for permission to continue. During the 20- to 30-minute session, the TTS collects a tobacco-use history and determines if the patient is currently on a nicotine replacement therapy patch to help deal with cravings.
The TTS also determines the patient’s readiness to quit and begins a conversation about the quitting process before ending the consultation with an offer of information about the FirstQuit outpatient program and a referral to the NC Quitline. Patients are left with a “busy bag” of support materials that also helps them deal with cravings.
“We commend all three FirstHealth hospitals for their hard work in becoming some of the first North Carolina hospitals to adopt a quit-tobacco system for patients and now earning the Gold Heart.” says Melva Fager Okun, senior manager, NC Prevention Partners. “They are doing a great job in supporting their patients in quitting the use of tobacco. I applaud their great effort.”
The work of NC Prevention Partners in North Carolina hospitals is funded by The Duke Endowment and is in partnership with the NC Hospital Association.
thecherawchronicle.com

Kennesaw Smyrna to join Acworth in allowing Sunday sales

Stores in three Cobb cities will be able to sell alcohol on Sundays on New Year’s Day, but some merchants aren’t anticipating a flood of business.
“There was a little sales boost, but not a lot,” said Anand Patel with Acworth Tobacco and Liquor off Cowan Road in Acworth, where Sunday sales have been allowed since Dec. 1.
On New Year’s Day, Kennesaw and Smyrna will join Acworth in allowing Sunday sales. Voters in each of the three cities approved their respective measures on Nov. 8.
Voters in unincorporated Cobb and the cities of Austell, Powder Springs and Marietta will cast their ballots on the matter in the presidential primary election on March 6.
The new law allows grocery stores, gas stations, liquor stores and drug stores to sell packaged alcohol between 12:30 and 11:30 p.m. on Sundays if approved by voters.
The extra day of sales hasn’t yet boosted business as much as Patel had hoped, however.
“I expected it to be a little busier,” Patel said. “We are getting there though. The more people that start to know about it, the more it’s going to help us, I guess.”
One thing that Patel said he has noticed since Sunday sales went into effect is an increase in new customers.
“We’ve been really seeing a lot of new faces,” he said. “I haven’t seen any of them before.”
The Acworth store is open on Sundays between 12:30 and 7:30 p.m.
One Smyrna store plans to test Sunday sales for a month, but won’t start immediately. Dustin Desautell, a cashier with Smyrna Liquors off Spring Road in south Cobb, said the store will try opening on Sunday for the month of January, but not until Jan. 8 so that employees can have New Year’s Day off.
“We’re not sure how well it’s going to do because we predicted that it will take away from our Saturday sales,” he said Wednesday. “We’re not even sure if we’ll sell enough products to even be open on that day.”
Desautell said the store owners will determine if the sales numbers are worth opening the extra day each week when the month-long trial is over.
“We’ve heard from other counties … that it’s diminishing their Saturday sales,” he said. “(Customers) think about Sundays so they don’t come in on Saturdays as much.”
Craig Maske, a general manager with Sherlock’s Purveyor of Fine Wines, Spirits and Beers, said he is in favor of whatever voters decide in regards to Sunday alcohol sales.
The company is already selling alcohol on Sundays at its store in Decatur, where the law went into effect Nov. 27, and expects to start at its Atlanta location Sunday. It has two locations in unincorporated Cobb County, near Kennesaw and Marietta, and another in DeKalb County. Maske said all three of those locations would sell on Sundays if voters approve the changes in their counties.
However, Maske said he isn’t sure the extra day will translate to more business.
“(Approval) has happened during the busiest season of the year, so it’s hard to say what it’s done,” he said about the Decatur location. “The newness is going to wear off. From what I’ve read and researched, generally there hasn’t been a growth in business if alcohol can be sold on Sundays. I haven’t seen any compelling information.”
Cobb County commissioners, with the exception of Woody Thompson because he was absent, voted unanimously on Nov. 8 to put the referendum on the spring ballot. If approved, it would start June 1.
Austell’s city council voted 5-0 on Dec. 5 to place it on the ballot. If approved, Sunday alcohol sales in Austell would begin March 18.
Powder Springs’ council voted 4-1, with councilwoman Nancy Hudson opposing on religious grounds, on Nov. 21 to place the referendum on the March ballot.
City clerk Dawn Davis said Sunday alcohol sales would become effective when the elections superintendent certifies the election results, which is usually within the week after the election.
The Marietta City Council voted unanimously on Oct. 12 to place the question on the primary ballot. If passed, it would take effect in the city on March 18.
There are 23 businesses eligible to apply for the license in Kennesaw, 25 in Acworth and 47 in Smyrna. If voters approve the change, 253 businesses will be affected unincorporated Cobb County; 6 in Austell, and 85 in Marietta. Numbers for Powder Springs were not available by press time.
A Sunday alcohol sales license for the City of Acworth costs $100 each for liquor, beer or wine, $300 in Kennesaw and $500 in Smyrna. Costs for the county and cities that will be considering the vote in March have not been determined.
By Lindsay Field
mdjonline.com

Potsdam's Tobacco Cessation Center offers a quitting smoking plan for 2012

Tobacco Cessation Center of NNY
Let’s make our community healthier and save lives by quitting smoking in 2012.
St. Lawrence County has one of the highest smoking prevalence rates in the state at 25%, whereas, the state average is at it’s all time lowest at 16%. As you know, tobacco use is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. It accounts for at least 30% of all cancer deaths, as well 87% of lung cancer deaths, which in 2012 will total about 157,000. Tobacco use also increases the risk for cancers of the mouth, lips, nasal cavity, larynx, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, kidney, bladder, uterus, cervix, colon/rectum, ovary, and acute myeloid leukemia.
Therefore, as 2011 comes to a close and the New Year approaches let’s make a plan to quit smoking and become a healthier community in St. Lawrence County.
Here is a plan to follow:
1. Think of your plan to quit smoking as a project, a process that will take time and not one that is a snap decision or that will take only a few days. Remember you are embarking on a journey to change a behavior or habit that took many years to develop, however do not give up because you can do it!
2. Make a list of all the reasons you would like to quit smoking, such as: your health, family/ friends, money etc.-and keep that list in your pocket at all times and take it out every time you are tempted to smoke (laminate the list).
3. Decide on a quit date. However, make sure your quit date is not during a stressful time.
4. Tell your family, friends and co-workers your plan to quit and ask for their support.
5. Talk to your physician about your plan to quit and discuss with them whether one of the seven FDA approved medications for quitting might be the most useful for you. Also, you may contact the NY Smokers’ Quit line at 1-866-697-8487 or www.nysmokefree.com.
6. In the days before your quit date, clean out your car, house and workplace of all extra packs of cigarettes, ashtrays, lighters, matches and anything that might tempt you to smoke.
7. On the quit day call your family and friends and let them know the big day has arrived and ask them for support.
8. Be prepared for some of the immediate side effects of quitting such as: headache, light headedness, anxiety, nausea, irritability, unable to sleep, unable to concentrate, etc.
9. If you slip, don’t give up! Look at the situation that caused your slip and adjust your routine, so you are not in that situation for a couple of months to avoid the danger of slipping again.
10. Remember this is a journey of a lifetime and you will need support from your family and friends.
Benefits of quitting smoking! After you smoke your last cigarette, within in 20 minutes, your body begins a series of changes that continue for years.
• 20 minutes after quitting your blood pressure drops, blood begins to flow more smoothly and your heart rate drops.
• 12 hours after quitting the carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal and your brain starts to receive the oxygen that is has been deprived of while smoking.
• 2 weeks to 3 months after quitting your heart attack risk begins to drop and your lung function begins to improve.
• 1 to 9 months after quitting your coughing and shortness of breath will decrease.
• 1 year after quitting your added risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker’s.
• 5 years after quitting your risk of suffering a stroke is reduced to that of a nonsmoker’s 5-15 years after quitting.
• 10 years after quitting your lung cancer death rate is about half that of a smoker’s and your risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas decreases.
• 15 years after quitting the risk of heart disease is back to that of a nonsmoker’s.
Did you know that more American’s died last year from smoking related diseases then all the Americans that died in WWII?
By BETH GERO
northcountrynow.com

Restaurant smoke law gets tougher

RESTAURANTS will be considered entirely tobacco-free if the owners don’t separate smoking and non-smoking areas, according to a new rule to tighten smoking control in local eateries.
The rule requires restaurants larger than 150 square meters or that have over 75 seats to set up smoking and non-smoking areas. Those failing to do so will face punishment, officials said yesterday as a spot check was carried out citywide.
Fourteen restaurants and two individuals have been fined 28,100 yuan (US$4,460) so far this year for violating the city’s first anti-tobacco law, which bans smoking in 13 types of places like hospitals and kindergartens and requires establishment of smoking and non-smoking areas in middle-sized and large restaurants, said officials from the Shanghai Health Promotion Commission.
Officials said they carried out enforcement actions with different targets this year. By September, the city had fined 48 business venues and six individuals for breaking the anti-smoking law.
“The new rule is to make the law more feasible and give restaurants stronger pressure on smoking control,” said Gu Xiping from Shanghai Health Promotion Commission.
She said the commission has informed all local restaurants big enough to come under the new law. Restaurants smaller than 150 square meters or 75 seats are not covered by the local anti-smoking law.
“A unified smoking-control sign with the official complaint hotline 962727 has also been distributed recently,” Gu said.
During yesterday’s spot check, most restaurants said they were aware of the new rule and had carried out necessary measures.
Officials of Heji and Yue-you restaurants in Minhang District said both had put out signs to alert customers.
“We have three business floors,” said an official identified as He of Yueyou Restaurant. “The first and third ones are public eating areas, which ban smoking completely, while the second floor is VIP rooms where guests can smoke.”
Health officials also visited some restaurants that failed to pass the previous checks. Mengxiangcun Restaurant on Qixing Road has improved while Ayingbao on Zhongyi Road still has not, they said.
Although there was a ventilation system in Ayingbao, the smoking and non-smoking areas were connected, making non-smokers exposed to smoke and poor air quality.
Officials claimed they would impose punishment if the restaurant didn’t make any progress next time.
Local residents hailed the stricter measures.
“It can effectively protect women and children from second-hand smoke,” said Qi Yan, with her two-year-old son.
eastday.com

Modi hints at higher taxes on tobacco products

Deputy chief minister Sushil Kumar Modi said here on Wednesday that taxes would be hiked on tobacco products and pan masala in a bid to discourage their use as they cause cancer. Stressing the need for an intensive campaign against the use of tobacco and tobacco products, he said an inter-departmental committee would be set up for reducing their use.
He urged health minister Ashwini Kumar Chaubey to launch a programme for school students where they could take pledge against the use of tobacco and its products. Modi was addressing an interactive programme, ‘Voice of Tobacco Victims’, at which cancer-affected patients and their family members described their plight due to use of tobacco. They also demanded a stringent policy for tobacco control and ban on sale of tobacco and its products as per the provisions of Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products (Prohibition of Advertisement and Regulation of Trade and Commerce, Production, Supply and Distribution) Act (COTPA), 2003.
The programme was organized jointly by Cancer Awareness Society (CAS) and Healis-Sekhsaria Institute of Public Health. Former DGP and national president of CAS T P Sinha made a fervent appeal for government action for checking the use of tobacco and its products as their use caused cancer and claimed one lakh lives every year in Bihar, and to implement the COTPA Act. He referred to the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) 2010 report that 53.5% of adult population in Bihar used tobacco products in one or the other form.
Health minister Ashwini Kumar Chaubey said that the financial loss caused by tobacco-triggered cancer to the affected families and society was five times more than the tax revenue generated by sale of tobacco and its products. Dr Pankaj Chaturvedi, an oncologist from Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, said that 90% cancer patients reaching him were tobacco users and 50% of them were from Bihar. More than two crore people in Bihar were tobacco users and one crore of them may get affected by cancer, he said, adding that only 20% of cancer patients survive as 90% cancer patients reach hospitals at an advanced stage. IGIMS director Arun Kumar stressed on checking use of cancer as “prevention is better than cure”.
indiatimes.com

Tobacco growing districts to get Rs236m uplift fund

PESHAWAR: The Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government will spend Rs236.5 million tobacco cess proceeds on development projects in seven tobacco growing districts of the province.

The decision to spend the cess funds on improving infrastructure facilities in the tobacco growing districts was made at a high-level meeting chaired by Chief Minister Ameer Haider Khan Hoti, says a handout on Wednesday.
It said that Swabi, Mardan, Charsadda, Buner, Nowshera, Malakand and Mansehra districts would get funds in accordance with a resource distribution formula developed last year.
These districts would get funds in accordance with their share in tobacco yield recorded last year.
The meeting reviewed the use of tobacco cess funds generated last year. According to the handout, the chief minister expressed satisfaction over the results of the last year`s tobacco cess-funded development schemes in the seven districts.
Provincial agriculture minister Arbab Ayub Jan and MPAs, including Pervez Khan, Sikandar Irfan, Ahmad Khan Bahader, Qaiser Wali Khan and Syed Rahim attended the meeting in addition to administrative secretaries of finance, planning and development, local government and excise departments.
The handout claimed that the incumbent provincial government had streamlined the use of tobacco cess on development schemes in the tobacco growing districts. It said that previously the funds used to be spent even in non-tobacco growing districts.
Speaking on the occasion, the chief minister claimed that the provincial government had ensured the funds use on the welfare and development of areas with tobacco yield.
Meanwhile, Mr Hoti expressed satisfaction over the pace of rehabilitation activities to resettle people affected by the last year`s floods.
He was briefed about the rehabilitation activities, reconstruction of infrastructure, funds availability and problems confronted in implementing the development works in the affected areas. The meeting reviewed details of development projects concerning health, education, communication, irrigation and drinking water.
Speaking on the occasion, the chief minister appreciated the work done for early rehabilitation of damaged infrastructure in the flood-affected parts of the province.
dawn.com

Nelson wants casino smoking ban lifted

Deadwood casinos that have blamed the smoking ban for a loss in revenue over the past year could get a break if state Sen. Tom Nelson, R-Lead, gets his way.
Nelson has drafted legislation that will exempt Deadwood casinos from the smoking ban.
The voter-approved ban that was enacted in November 2010 is being blamed for a drop in gambling revenue, which is the main reason an exemption should be considered, according to the state senator.
“The smoking ban has been devastating to gaming revenue,” Nelson said. “The governor in his address said gaming revenue was down because of the smoking ban.”
Casino owners were hoping revenue would bounce back quickly once the ban was implemented, but it has not, Nelson said.
Total gambling revenue last month was 6.87 percent higher than revenue in November 2010, when the ban was first passed. But it was one of the few months in 2011 in which revenue was up year over year. Overall, gambling brought in $99.7 million from January to November in 2010 compared to $93.7 million over the same time period in 2011.
On principle, businesses should be able to decide whether they want to allow smoking, Nelson said.
“It needs to be a business decision regardless,” he said.
The exemption would affect the gambling floor only; the ban would remain at restaurants and bars, he said.
Though Nelson recognizes the health concerns that helped pass the ban last year, he believes voters would still have passed the ban even if a gambling exemption had been worked into the bill.
“It’s a health issue, and nobody’s going to argue that. I agree 1,000 percent that second-hand smoke is bad,” he said. But “if Deadwood exemptions had been (in the ban), it would have passed by the same margin.”
Cleo Snow, general manager of Miss Kitty’s casino, agreed that the smoking ban has hurt business.
“I’ve noticed a drop in people that come,” Snow said. “Everybody thought we’d get all the non-smokers. They didn’t come.”
Many gamblers are looking for a complete gambling experience, according to Snow.
“A drink in one hand, a cigarette in the other hand and pushing a button, all go hand in hand,” she said.
Snow acknowledges the atmosphere of a smoke-free room is appealing.
“I love the smell of it not being smoky in here, but we need people coming back,” she said. “You don’t want to stand outside in sub-zero weather to smoke.”
At least one casino worker likes the smoke-free environment in Deadwood.
Marty Weissinger, who has worked in the gambling industry for 21 years, is a slot tech and bartender at Deadwood Gulch. He prefers an environment where children don’t have to inhale smoke and where gamblers don’t drop cigarette butts on the floor, he said.
“Everybody has a right to smoke as far as that goes, but there’s two sides of a coin. Everybody has a right to not be breathing secondhand smoke,” he said.
The legislation would also exempt service, fraternal and veteran’s organizations with liquor licenses.
rapidcityjournal.com

North Carolina Prevention Partners recognizes FirstHealth hospitals

North Carolina Prevention Partners has recognized FirstHealth of the Carolinas for providing the highest standard of excellence for tobacco-cessation programs offered to patients.
The three FirstHealth hospitals – Moore Regional in Pinehurst, Richmond Memorial in Rockingham and Montgomery Memorial in Troy – were acknowledged as Gold Heart Standard Hospitals. FirstHealth is the first health system in the state to receive the recognition.
NC Prevention Partners works with corporate leaders and staffs in North Carolina hospitals to enhance tobacco-cessation efforts and resources available to all hospital employees and patients. The FirstHealth hospitals were recognized for identifying tobacco-using patients as a required vital sign, providing a team approach to cessation counseling, providing and promoting evidence-based treatments, and evaluating the quit-tobacco system. These are among several components recommended by NC Prevention Partners for comprehensive quit-tobacco systems for patients.
FirstHealth’s inpatient tobacco-cessation program is provided by Community Health Services. Health Programs Manager Linda Harte supervises the team of specially trained health educators who work with the program. She says the inpatient program, which began as a pilot at Moore Regional during the summer of 2009, was a logical expansion of the established outpatient FirstQuit program that was started more than 10 years ago.
FirstQuit receives daily referrals from FirstHealth Home Care Services for patients who are discharged from the tobacco-free environment of a hospital only to find themselves challenged to continue their tobacco-free status at home.
A couple of years ago, that situation prompted a discussion about tobacco-cessation services that could be offered to inpatients and, Harte says, “how we could identify tobacco-using patients sooner” and “support them better while in the hospital.”
Eventually, the discussion turned toward giving hospitalized patients the motivation and confidence to remain tobacco free once they got home and providing options that would help them achieve their tobacco-free goal.
A committee comprised of staff representatives from various FirstHealth departments worked for about six months to develop the inpatient plan. The process they came up with begins as the patient is being admitted to the hospital and is identified by nursing staff as being a tobacco-user. It continues when the physician in charge of the patient’s hospitalization orders a consultation with a Community Health Services tobacco treatment specialist (TTS).
During the bedside consultation, the patient is told that his/her doctor requested the session and asked for permission to continue. During the 20- to 30-minute session, the TTS collects a tobacco-use history and determines if the patient is currently on a nicotine replacement therapy patch to help deal with cravings.
The TTS also determines the patient’s readiness to quit and begins a conversation about the quitting process before ending the consultation with an offer of information about the FirstQuit outpatient program and a referral to the NC Quitline. Patients are left with a “busy bag” of support materials that also helps them deal with cravings.
“We commend all three FirstHealth hospitals for their hard work in becoming some of the first North Carolina hospitals to adopt a quit-tobacco system for patients and now earning the Gold Heart.” says Melva Fager Okun, senior manager, NC Prevention Partners. “They are doing a great job in supporting their patients in quitting the use of tobacco. I applaud their great effort.”
The work of NC Prevention Partners in North Carolina hospitals is funded by The Duke Endowment and is in partnership with the NC Hospital Association.
By Special to the Chronicle
thecherawchronicle.com

Tobacco Outlook for 2012

Retailers weigh in on plans for their 2012 tobacco sets in CSP’s 2011 Outlook Survey
For participants in CSP’s 2011 Tobacco Outlook Survey, the past year has presented a supreme challenge to grow inside sales even as the national and local economies sputtered and fuel demand slumped. The annual survey, which polled 188 retailers representing thousands of convenience stores on business conditions in the past year and their plans for the next, was conducted in mid-October.
Nearly 57% of Outlook Survey participants describe current business conditions as “flat” or “poor,” compared to 51% in the 2010 Outlook Survey. Only 5.3% characterized conditions as “excellent,” vs. 7.1% in 2010. (Because the participants of the survey and the degree of participation change from year to year, the results represent a directional indicator of industry attitudes.)
In the tobacco category, nearly 43% of Outlook Survey respondents plan to keep their set the same in 2012, while more than 30% will grow some subcategories and shrink others.
The most popular areas to grow: flavored cigars (52.3%) and moist smokeless (52.3%). (Respondents could pick as many options as they wished.)
Respondents say they will primarily cut premium cigarettes (54.6%).
A catalyst for premium cigarettes has been Altria’s Marlboro Leadership Price (MLP) program, which recommends a “maximum” cigs4us.biz/marlboro-cigarette. For Bill Douglass, CEO of Douglass Distributing Co., Sherman, Texas, which operates 15 Lone Star sites, inside sales are up largely because of a 25% leap in cigarette sales tied to his adoption of the program. At the same time, he took a large hit in gross profits by more than that figure.
For Roger St. George, president of St. George Stores Inc., a 7-Eleven franchisee with three sites based in Aberdeen, Wash., unit sales of cigarettes have been steady, although the company is not participating in the MLP program. “There’s definitely growth in OTP,” St. George says. “But the biggest challenge is shelf contracts out there from Reynolds and Altria really limit creativity.
Despite the majority saying they would shrink premium cigarettes, more than one-fifth (21.5%) did say they would grow the category, however.
Other areas of growth for tobacco sets included snus (21.5%), make-your-own and roll-your-own cigarettes (18.5%) and other (7.7%).
To see retailer plans outside of tobacco, and for more on the 2011 CSP Outlook Survey, please see the December issue of CSP magazine.
cspnet.com

Orange Bowl Scraps Cigar Deal

Orange Bowl officials said that they have scrapped a planned sponsorship deal with Camacho Cigars, reported the Associated Press. Orange Bowl spokesperson Larry Wahl told the news agency that after mutual review, it was determined that it would not be appropriate to go forward with the sponsorship.
Earlier this month, Pinellas Park, Fla.-based Davidoff of Geneva and the Orange Bowl Committee announced a new three-year agreement that would have made Camacho Cigars a corporate sponsor of the Orange Bowl Festival, which included the 2012, 2013 and 2014 Discover Orange Bowls and 2013 Discover BCS National Championship.
The sponsorship included a large presence at several game-day events at Sun Life Stadium leading up to the 2012-2014 Discover Orange Bowls and 2013 Discover BCS National Championship. Football fans, VIPs and Committee members would have had access to onsite Camacho lounges where premium cigars could be enjoyed throughout the day. At the Orange Bowl Game Day Fan Zone, the Orange Bowl’s largest pregame event, guests could relax before kickoff in the Camacho Club Lounge. There would also have been two cigar lounges located in the designated smoking areas of the stadium on the Club Level for attendees of the Orange Bowl VIP pregame party.
Last week, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the American Cancer Society and eight other groups sent a letter (click here to view the full text of the letter) to game organizers and officials with the collegiate athletic group that raised concerns over the deal.
“The association of cigar smoking with one of the nation’s top collegiate sporting events sends the wrong message to impressionable young fans and helps market cigars as athletic, masculine and cool,” the groups wrote in the letter. “Linking tobacco use to sports also downplays the serious health risks of tobacco products.”
In the letter, the groups said that the cigar company sponsorship conflicts with NCAA rules that forbid student-athletes and all game personnel from using tobacco in any form at practice or in competitions.
Also last week, U.S. senators Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Frank R. Lautenberg (D-N.J.) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) called on the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Orange Bowl Committee to reconsider a three-year agreement making a cigar company–Camacho Cigars–a corporate sponsor of the Discover Orange Bowl.
“Tobacco has no place in sports, and the promotion of cigars at the Orange Bowl sends the wrong message to young fans,” the senators wrote (click here to view the full text of the letter). “A tobacco company’s sponsorship of the Orange Bowl undermines a premier collegiate sporting event and promotes tobacco use to young fans, putting them at risk of developing an addictive and dangerous habit. Furthermore, Camacho Cigars’ sponsorship is at odds with the NCAA rules prohibiting tobacco use by student athletes and all game personnel in any form at practice and in competitions.”
This season’s Orange Bowl is scheduled for Wednesday, January 4 in Miami, where No. 23 West Virginia will play No. 14 Clemson.
Founded in 1961 by Simon Camacho, Camacho Cigars was acquired by the Eiroa family in 1995. Now part of the Oettinger Davidoff Group, Camacho Cigars is one of the key players in the international cigar market. The flagship Camacho brand, made at Rancho Jamastran in Danli, Honduras, is comprised of 11 premium and super-premium line extensions: Super-Premium (Diploma, 10th Anniversary Corojo, Liberty Series, Triple Maduro, Select), Premium (Corojo, Connecticut, Coyolar, Havana, SLR and Room101). Camacho Cigars also has seven core brands, including Baccarat The Game.
cspnet.com