A new bill introduced by the tobacco tax

A new wrinkle appeared due to the tobacco tax scandal in Randolph County, with an open set of hearings on Tuesday in Montgomery, the second version of the bill address the allocation of funds from taxes on tobacco in Randolph County. This, like the one that has passed legislation only to be vetoed by Governor Robert Bentley, has been declared as required by law.

Georgia Arrington, local official committee of the legislation, said the interested parties on Friday morning that a public hearing on the new bill will be held on Tuesday, May 8 at 10:00 in room 622 at the Statehouse Alabama.

 It will be for the newly introduced bill, HB785, by Rep. Richard Laird, (D-Roanoke). Laird did not respond to repeated phone calls Friday. The bill was the same as the governor vetoed, but with a different formula for the distribution of funds.

Governor Robert Bentley vetoed all three local unpopular bills relating to the distribution of tobacco taxes in Randolph, Chambers and Clay County on Thursday. The bills were designed Sen. Gerald Dial, R-Lineville, and touted Congressman Laird and the Republic of DuWayne Bridges, R-Valley.

A spokesman from the governor, Jeremy King, said: “There were discrepancies between what is published about these accounts and the essence of what actually took place. Governor Bentley has been concern about the discrepancies and vetoed the bills.”

Senator set, in between meetings on Friday, questioned whether the governor vetoed the bill. “I met with the Governor today at 11:30. He said that he would not veto them. I have not heard anything else from him. He’s a good man, Christian, Sunday school teacher, and he said to the 30 school children, Richard and I, he did not veto them, “Dial said.

“I think someone in the governor’s office made a mistake,” Dial said. He said that the decision on Tuesday, when he returned to Montgomery. In response, King said that the veto was not a mistake, and the governor’s office expects that the veto will stand.

The senator said that his priority is set now works for the redistribution of the special session, which is set for 14-18 May. He is chairman of the committee, and there are many details to work, he said. According to the group against the bill, Rep. Laird HB-785 is worse than a bill that was vetoed.

Randolph County bipartisan coalitions, and institutions and organizations against the bill referred to call themselves, according to a press release that they predicted the senator and congressman set Laird will not give up his $ 750,000 “slush fund” without a fight – even after the governor’s veto Bentley.

The coalition immediately asked for a public hearing on the new bill, which was granted a house of local legislation, Deputy Chairman of the committee, Rep. Alan Baker (R-Brewton). Coalition members said they were “very much appreciates the Governor Robert Bentley, recognizing that the Dial-Laird account tobacco taxes have been very bad for the citizens of Randolph and neighboring countries and the entire state of Alabama.

“The fact that the Governor listened to the Bentley people, when our local legislators have refused to do so, certainly helped to restore our faith that the government should be for the people and the people,” said Todd Freeman and David Meddick, chairmen of the Republican Party of Randolph County and Randolph County Democratic Party, in a rare joint statement.

Randolph County Republican and Democratic party chairs are among those who opposed the reallocation of these tobacco tax bills that will take cash and local control of local agencies at the present time they are received and put money in the fund, a grant under the exclusive control of and Unregulated set, Laird, and bridges.

Local attorney Kesa Johnston Dunn, who takes an active part in opposing the changes, elevated, although she warns it is not yet finished. She notes that a simple majority of the legislative veto can overcome the governor, and she doubts the motivation of the introduction of even more stringent version of the bill after the first was vetoed.

She urged people to the governor know that they appreciate his courage in vetoing the bill, and thank him. Call 334-242-7100 for the governor and ask for Tyler vice component of the service, she said. Freeman said he was pleased that the Governor listened to what people are saying when they could not get the “audience” with lawmakers.

SB486, a bill that was vetoed, called for the elimination of funding currently going to the water Randolph County, sewer and power to fire safety, reduced to 24 percent of the amount will be Randolph County Industrial Development Board for the job no more than 20 percent may be for personnel costs, and using 10 percent of the total tobacco tax to create a government grant under the exclusive control of recruitment and Laird, even if the bill, which has been declared the leader Randolph called for the Office of Community Service District, and grant of power, which appeared in the final account.

HB785, the bill introduces Laird after the Governor’s veto, as well as calls for a Community Service Office area, and also eliminates funding for the water district office. Instead of 24 percent of the total going to the industrial development board, however, Bill Laird reduces this to 15 percent, and specify no more than 20 percent may be used for staff costs. 10 percent of the grant for the newly established government / district office is now dead, SB486 increases to 19 percent in Laird HB785.

(Bridges is part of the chambers.) Set, which the majority whips in the Senate, does not have these countries, as well as part or all of Cherokee, Cleburne and Lee counties. Against Randolph County Randolph County bills the Democratic and Republican parties, Randolph County Chamber of Commerce, Randolph County Economic Development Authority and the Water Randolph County, sanitation and fire protection authorities.

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